The Duncan Trussell Family Hour
| EMIL AMOS II
  • you will like this
  • great show. Love to Duncan, Emil, Brian, Richard, Laughing Skull, Marshal, Joe, Only Assholes, The girl laughing in the background, Cat/Yusuf, Whiskey and Ice, Dirty Brown Rivers, Acid with Germans, the Father, Son, and Holy Ghost. It keeps getting better and better. Fuck a Benz. I'll take a Shack with a podcast.

    The last song was so GOOD and so APPROPRIATE!

    love to all the family,
    Antonio Gaudi
    We elongate our Maaans 'round these parts.
  • Mr Reichle's response to the intro of this podcast:

    @redban
    WE ARE NOT FRIENDS FUCKER. Keep up with your lies, you are the last person that knows ANYTHING about what I do. #BIGWORDS
    Post edited by doubleXhelix at 2012-05-03 23:34:45
  • @doubleXhelix
    I didn't know that I started listening to a soap opera. *sigh* fuck it, over it, their not friends and Duncan won't be back on JRE, whatever. Positive Energy

    Great show with Emil though. Always a pleasure.

    I really wish Emil expanded a little more with his idea of predestination. I completely agree with him that things are predetermined but would just like to know on what grounds he places this belief that we are for the most part "designed from the outside." Because of physical determinism, like I do, or because of some higher power that determines? I also would like to know if he believes in free will. I think that would be my dream conversation with Duncan and Emil.

    Challenge for the sake of challenge, play for the sake of play
  • such a great podcastee
  • great show!!
    " we just wake up! Bling! Eyes of the planet open. That can happen". It totally can happen!!;)
    What a great conversation to listen in on. love you man



    ... the universe is the inside without any outside, the sound made by one eye opening. In fact, I don't even know that there is a universe. More likely, there are many multiverses, each with its own dimensions, times, spaces, laws and eccentricities. We wander between and among these multiverses, trying to convince others and ourseelves that we all walk together in a single public universe that we can share. For to deny that axiom leads to what is called schizophrenia.

    Yeah, that's it: every man's skin is his own private multiverse, just like every man's home is supposed to be his castle. But all the multiverses are trying to merge, to create a true universe such as we have only imagined previously. Maybe it will be spiritual, like Zen or telepathy, or maybe it will be physical, one great big gang-fuck, but it has to happpen: the creatin of a universe and the one great eye opening to see itself at last. Aum Shiva!

    - Oh, man, you're stoned out of your gourd. You're writing gibberish.

    No, I'm writing with absolute clarity, for the first time in my life.

    - Yeah? Well what was that business about the universe being the sound of one eye opening?

    Never mind that. Who the hell are you and how did you get into my head?`


    RAW n Shea. The Illuminatus!


    Om Ah Hum Vajra Guru Padma Siddhi Hum
  • duncanduncan
    El-ahrairah
    That Bhagavan Das video is great. I wish I had gone to that festival.

    @hobo-bonobo that's a great question. Maybe Emil will come here and answer it.
  • sitarsitar
    Hrair
    duncan said:

    That Bhagavan Das video is great. I wish I had gone to that festival.



    thanks, man. i love his dharma talks, they are the best. "become holy people"

    and bhaktifest happens 3x per year. the next one is next weekend.

    I'll be out there for the one in sept, i go every year.




    Mr. Takahashi would like to see you all in his office now

    sitaramdas.com
    @sitaramdas
  • messimessi
    Hrair
  • Good apology Duncan. Everyone makes mistakes. To own it, say you're sorry, and call it unskillful creates a positive path forward i.e. the intent to act more skillfully the next time something like this arises.
    The secret game evolved organically, but also relatively
    quickly, apropos to the accelerated pace of the times. Some people got introduced to the game by other
  • HoggyHoggy
    Hrair
    Maybe these would good Zizek lectures to go on (that documentary is funny but I don't know how much it actually shows his ideas - I especially like the scene with him in bed, I think that scene is a joke set up by Zizek :D )

    http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=FdzMCUaJQ6g&feature=results_video&playnext=1&list=PL84DCF88DEEEA0F3A
    http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=YbpU3CXciP0&feature=relmfu

    There's so much out there to see and listen to though.

    As to how Zizek applies - I feel intuitively that there is a general gap in how Duncan and Emil understand their own ideologies and those of others. Especially the way Emil expresses himself. I could listen through again and pick out examples if it is any help.

    Here's a funny Zizek vid :D http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=KjEtmZZvGZA

    EDIT: OK this might be the perfect one - it's very funny and also touches the key points http://player.vimeo.com/video/41178624
    Post edited by Hoggy at 2012-05-04 16:09:40
  • HoggyHoggy
    Hrair
    Here's a nice recent interview http://www.cbc.ca/day6/2012/04/30/43-minutes-and-3-seconds-with-zizek-the-complete-day-6-interview/

    You might need to refresh it or wait a sec for it to load but it does work
  • Wow, Duncan I would like to say thank you for opening my eyes and ears to Cat Stevens. When you played his song on your last podcast I listened to it about 3 times then put it in Pandora and my mind was blown. About 5 hours later I still haven't returned to listen to the rest of the podcast (and I will) and I haven't been able to hold back my tears. Yes, I've been sobing like a little girl for 5 hours. I'm severely dehydrated and my eyes are so puffy I can barely see and I have a headache. Outside of all that, I have never felt better.

    The odd part is that I don't usually listen to this type of music. I grew up on the Southside of Chicago in the so called ghetto. Ice Cube was my artist of choice and I drive a Chrysler 300 with giant 22" chrome rims. A black man like me can't be seen listening to Cat Stevens in that car!

    What do I do now?
  • Duncan i love you !! Wow, this was the most entertaining podcast ever, the story how Emil got attacked by dog and all the junkies in that neighbourhood i havent laughed so hard .. i was in tears.... i thought joes podcast was the shit but it hink this is even better i m on the same wavelength like you and emil you got a new fan
  • This was a frustrating episode to try and get through - Emil seemed distracted, uninterested and boring. Maybe podcasts should be in-person interviews only, rather than Skype? That way you have a captive audience, rather than one whose girlfriend can interrupt them every 15 minutes?
  • Emil was in GREAT form this particular podcast. He became the smart, great person he is and kind of showed Duncan that "the rock doesn't miraculously fly off" and he's right! I took notes.

    First, they talk about people who come into your lives as "Supernovas and have too much Gravity that they can't stay (sic)" Great way to explain relationships that happen. That has been my only experiences. So that was cool.

    What the 60's did (in RE to the David Crosby quote) was tear down tradition, just like they did in France. And what happened? Hierarchy again emerged. THis was said most eloquently in Edmund Burke's "Reflections on The Revolution in France," a founding conservative document. And our parents-or D's parents and mine--- of the baby boomer generation, didn't realize WHY the tradition was there. In America this leads to Atheists Christmas, and in Rwanda, genocide. When a post-industrial country leaves it in the hands of tribal societies, bad things happen.

    The Man of the Future WILL look like a man of the past because he or she will be timeless, and the most radical thing in the world since the Boomeritis baby boomers is, in fact, tradition. I like Emil's argument for tradition. Duncan just sees how fast things are changing...

    One last thought. Machiavelli was named after the Devil and the Devil was named of Niccolo Machiavelli. HE was the one that destroyed the traditional view that human beings are good. He thought human beings were Evil. Hobbes took that and made it influential in England with Leviathan, which has, at its root, the State of Nature where life is "nasty, brutish and short." And so this view is continued through Locke, the Founding Fathers and even up to today.

    That's all for now, but this was an interesting discussion on a Joey Diaz level. 2nd best podcast ever! Saved my child's life. 3 stars. :-)
    -B
  • Mark
    Hrair
    Inventors Create Spray That Gets You Drunk Instantly without the Nasty Side-Effects

    Scientist David Edwards teamed up with French Designer Philippe Starck to create the WA|HH mouth spray that gets you drunk instantly, but only for a few seconds. And the best part is you won’t have to deal with and splitting headaches when you wake up the following day.

    http://www.odditycentral.com/funny/inventors-create-spray-that-gets-you-drunk-instantly-without-the-nasty-side-effects.html
  • Emil can't find tha words in English for the existential crisis we all face, so he has to go through song and express it that way. Jimi Hendric was like that.

    Speaking of which, did any of you catch that part? Hendrix the Musician, poster, and woman smacker. And yes he punched bitches. Look at James Brown. But w/out knowing it they noted the Big Three:I, We, It. Good True and the Beautiful. Aesthetics, Science and Ethics.

    But what was cool was the referece to th Euthrypro Dialogue of Plato, who cretead Socrates as Shakes-spear (shaking of the spear, John Dee wrote those plays under thst name. Who shook spears? The Goddess, Athena, Minvera...the White Moon Godess of Robert Graves, Elizabethean Rosacrucian Enlightenment, which THEY thought too the boulder would fly off suddenly and it didn't. There's nothing like the hubris of a person living in an age. We are just an age. The teansition won't cone without blood nor without sacrifice is what Emil (I think) was trying to say. It won't be so easy as "plugging in.")

    Shakespeare who created Macbeth. So is it REALLY Socrates? No. It's Plato, who burned the plays he was working on to follow his mentor, Socrates. Love "that was the equivalent to a shitty YouTube comment at tge time" hahaha.

    I would suggest Brave New World for the book club. And CS Lewis' Mere Christianity. Emil reminded me a bit of Lewis because he kept going back to "it's what we mean by" this or that. Lewis does this a lot. It's hard to argue withthst masterpiece and I bet it would convert some people back from when they were told lies as children, forced early when you wanted to sleep in, etc.. But, like Bilbo said you go There and Back Again. At the end is always the Return.

    And if there is Novelty, it's going to expresss Truth. And what is True is NOT what is false. It isn't Pantheism where ALL the Earth, even Evil, is okay. No. Since the Novelty arrow is also an arrow of Truth Goodness and Beauty, you are RESPONSIBLE for calling out BS like Brian's. Stopping that btw. D's right. It's ruining this "family." yeah, collectives. But what happens when some dude is a dick? "his lifestyle choice" or "no, you are wrong?" A lot of us are TOO tolerant of BS these days.

    Great podcast! Wish he was the new co-host he was so wonderful.
    Brando
    Post edited by BrandonYoung at 2012-05-05 05:47:01
  • No Offence but its really not cool Duncan that you just attacked Redban on a live podcast that he doesnt pay any comics and compares him to that crazy guy who peed on a bunch of comics. Its really douchy and if you wanna apologize then do it in person dude and be sincere!

    Other than that keep up the good work with the podcast! ^^
  • No he didn't man...well kinda. Just actually listen to his apology on air. Love tge Pope, such a Merman.
  • moleface said:

    About Duncan's comments re: coming up with a version of alcohol without the hangover or negative impact on the body -

    GHB or benzos(xanax, klonopin, valium) are similar. Basically anything that acts on the GABA-A and/or GABA-B receptors, the same parts of the brain affected by booze, will have effects in the same ballpark as alcohol.


    Kava also operates this way, and gives a feeling remarkably like the happiness of being drunk and some discoordination but without the loss of judgment. Unfortunately, it's also very hepatoxic (bad for your liver).
  • sitarsitar
    Hrair
    Neryod said:

    Wow, Duncan I would like to say thank you for opening my eyes and ears to Cat Stevens. When you played his song on your last podcast I listened to it about 3 times then put it in Pandora and my mind was blown. About 5 hours later I still haven't returned to listen to the rest of the podcast (and I will) and I haven't been able to hold back my tears. Yes, I've been sobing like a little girl for 5 hours. I'm severely dehydrated and my eyes are so puffy I can barely see and I have a headache. Outside of all that, I have never felt better.

    The odd part is that I don't usually listen to this type of music. I grew up on the Southside of Chicago in the so called ghetto. Ice Cube was my artist of choice and I drive a Chrysler 300 with giant 22" chrome rims. A black man like me can't be seen listening to Cat Stevens in that car!

    What do I do now?




    I lol'd.

    also, i'd like to say that there is a particular kind of joy i feel when i meet a dude who on the outside seems all hard, and then he turns out to be really high consciousness and sweet. its not about where we are from, its about where we are, man.
    Mr. Takahashi would like to see you all in his office now

    sitaramdas.com
    @sitaramdas
  • Emil
    Hrair

    @doubleXhelix

    I really wish Emil expanded a little more with his idea of predestination. I completely agree with him that things are predetermined but would just like to know on what grounds he places this belief that we are for the most part "designed from the outside." Because of physical determinism, like I do, or because of some higher power that determines? I also would like to know if he believes in free will.



    To try & wrap this up idea up a little better,, I don't think that life itself is 'predestined',, but that each person's individual appetite/hunger for life/insight is... that each of our psyches have a design and that the level of curiosity that one has towards discovering 'the truth' is a pre-set amount -- life is the event in which our psyche unfolds into,, but our individual psyche's have their own design... in a sense,, you might say that someone like Ramana Maharshi is driven by an exceptional spiritual hunger,, but that the mainstream as a mass entity, is largely defined by an acute spiritual laziness ... a different fate -- I was thinking about Duncan's question a little more,, and I often use the phrase 'so & so changed my life' ...but for a skateboarder to 'change yr life' is to inspire you and possibly change yr immediate path in the sense that you might move to California or start wearing different clothes... but that doesn't really change 'you' does it? -- You gravitated towards these other beings or ideas in your life not necessarily because you worshiped at the altar of someone else who technically 'taught you something new'... but that deep down in the recesses of yr psyche, these affinities, these talents, these opinions are already there... you didn't just start liking the color blue yesterday... you may've realized that you liked it,,, but that affinity was ready to be discovered... >> does this help explain what I meant?? ,,, otherwise,, I think that a totally different conversation could explore synchronicity as some sort of temporal materialization of our individual 'fate' 10-4

    ...Also!,, I'd said "designed from the outset",, outside would mean something totally different..!
    Post edited by Emil at 2012-05-05 13:27:50
  • KHAN
    Owsla
    I like the idea. Its as if all the dreams and hopes we keep are like premonitions of our future haunting us in the present nudging us to fulfill the prophecy. It goes well with the idea that there is only 'now', that all things that happened or will happen, are happening at once.

    I feel I can say for certain that all things in this universe that are vibrating will eventually return to a state of calm.
  • Emil
    Hrair
    Well put!! //10-4
  • KHAN
    Owsla
  • HoggyHoggy
    Hrair
    I think that the psyche is the result of electrical signals in our brain, and that "if you look deep within yourself, you don't find insight, you find shit"

    I also think that your true self is "out there" in how you actually act, not deep within yourself waiting to emerge.
    Post edited by Hoggy at 2012-05-05 16:44:55
  • HoggyHoggy
    Hrair
    But just to contradict myself, I think that spiritual beliefs can still effectively function, even if nobody literally believes in them
  • Emil said:


    you didn't just start liking the color blue yesterday... you may've realized that you liked it,,, but that affinity was ready to be discovered...



    i totally get this. affinities that are there since we are born. or maybe even sooner. we can move to other cities, change friends, lifestyles, whatever but there's this immutable core that's really our deep nucleus self and that never truly changes.

    do you know what is the earliest concept of death i can remember? like what my child mind thought about dying before all the god experts told me their story at school, before reading people's theories about it, even before discussing these topics with friends or with anyone? it was this: when i die everything will just fade to black and then i'll start again from zero as a baby in some woman's belly with no recollection of previous me. and shit will just carry on. this is not reincarnation (didn't know what that was as a kid) but more like conscious energy reassignment after the vessel's expiration date. some light bulb somewhere goes off, some other one somewhere else goes on, but the current just keeps flowing.

    after all the books, theories, crazy websites and movies and songs and stuff that i have absorbed throughout all these years on the subject of death..... i still have not found a simpler and purer view on death than my child's perspective. this is an example of information that comes from that core....
    Post edited by dummyreplicant at 2012-05-05 19:29:37
  • Emil
    Hrair
    I can totally go with what yr saying about death as an (im)partial ending.... and yeah,, yr first paragraph is a good summary too>> //10-4!
  • HoggyHoggy
    Hrair

    do you know what is the earliest concept of death i can remember? like what my child mind thought about dying before all the god experts told me their story at school, before reading people's theories about it, even before discussing these topics with friends or with anyone? it was this: when i die everything will just fade to black and then i'll start again from zero as a baby in some woman's belly with no recollection of previous me. and shit will just carry on. this is not reincarnation (didn't know what that was as a kid) but more like conscious energy reassignment after the vessel's expiration date. some light bulb somewhere goes off, some other one somewhere else goes on, but the current just keeps flowing.

    after all the books, theories, crazy websites and movies and songs and stuff that i have absorbed throughout all these years on the subject of death..... i still have not found a simpler and purer view on death than my child's perspective. this is an example of information that comes from that core....



    dude I always imagined an eternity of nothing from the age of 5, did that information come from the core too? (serious question)
  • Man, I finally got around to listening to the Holy Sons, and I couldn't stop. You rarely hear that caliber of song writing ability.
  • I love Duncans explanation of the internet drama with Redban. I thought he explained it very well.
    Check out Tales From The Hardside podcast
  • I really liked this episode of DTFH. As a philosophy instructor, I've been interested in the issue of free will and predestination (or determinism) for a while. And, like Emil Amos, I felt that predestination was the most intuitive answer. In fact, I felt that way for years. Then, I read this: http://www.ucl.ac.uk/~uctytho/dfwvanInwagen1.htm

    The problem with believing in predestination is that it isn't possible to practice it. We make decisions all the time and it seems like when we make choices, we are in control. We make moral judgments, but if everything was predetermined, it wouldn't make sense to judge people. They couldn't have done otherwise. It's silly to blame someone for something they couldn't control. Like when someone suffering from tourette syndrom yells cuss words, we know it's not their fault. But, it's hard to resist calling Hitler evil and calling Martin Luther King a saint. It seems necessary to believe that we have freedom from predestination. I don't know though. I've had to suspend judgement on the issue of free will. I really wish someone could convince me one way or the other though.
    Post edited by CaptainJMoses at 2012-05-07 05:08:27
  • HoggyHoggy
    Hrair
    The shifting of perspectives or antagonism between predestination and free will is the reality
  • nekronekro
    Hrair
    Well said, is this podcast out?

    I tend to not really comment but I've been compelled to now due to the beginning of this podcast. I applaud you, Duncan, for being a man and showing humility about the Redban "Situation". None of it is any of the listeners business but if there is one thing that's constant, it's Redban's immaturity. I'm 26 years old. I can say I completely acted this way when I was 19/20 years old. Having this "situation" come to my attention during Rogan's podcast I saw that, yes Brian had a valid point in feeling slighted but when you have a beef with 3 completely different people, there's something up with you. Ari was completely right about everything he said about Brian. I shouldn't be surprised. So I'm not here to bash Redban and i hope he can look in himself to find better ways to address disagreements with people.

    I really don't know him or you, Duncan. I just know that from the outside looking at the situation, you apologizing and not saying "Fuck You" shows great character. We all say things we shouldn't at times or in the wrong tone but we're human. There's always room for error as well as reconciliation (I just reconciled with my mother two days ago for being a dick to her about something I shouldn't have). I'm sure you two will make up and all will be right in the Universe again.

    On another note I would like to thank you for these Podcasts. I was in a deep depression for about 18-24 months. Just got out of it 7 months ago due to listening you and Joe mostly. It all started with exercise and being consistent. it also allowed me to realize I'm NOT the only person that deals with the issues we all do everyday and no matter how bad I feel, I can always make change happen. So I'm proud to say I seek discomfort everyday which in turn creates comfort. It really isn't that bad. Fear is one strong bitch but only if we let her be that way.


    No more rubbing antenna's I say hello to people (With a smile) when I walk by. I don't much care for their response or lack of one sometimes. I know I put that energy out there.) I address cashiers by their name and say thank you to them. I have addressed the vampires in my life and fight them everyday because that's the only way towards true happiness. Thanks again and I hope this wasn't too much.

    Oh, you do know people earn millions for what you and Joe have done for me, right? I know I'm not the only person who has been positively touched by you two. It's cool. It's all coming back 10 fold. Have a Great Day!


    Thanks, Stig!

    -MC



  • amy
    Hrair
    I think @Hoggy has a valid point, if I'm reading it right. I haven't yet read much of the abundant literature on the subjects of predestination/free will/synchronicity etc, but I do have strong feelings about them based on personal experience.

    My thoughts are that we always have the freedom to make a choice or decision about something, but there will be a distinct difference in the outcome depending on whether the choice was made with the flow or against the flow - I guess you'd say in the direction of your pre-destination, or against it. Time and time again I find I'm rewarded for acting on my intuition, and punished for overthinking a decision or trying to manufacture a particular result.

    I see people struggling for years to force their lives in directions they doesn't want to go in, and having a really shit time with it - trying to make flawed relationships work, trying to conform when deep down they're a non-conformist, pursuing a sensible job for the money while neglecting their real passions etc. It's like they're coming up against all this resistance, and instead of acquiescing they're trying to push through it because they refuse to allow their animal instincts to overpower their rational intellect. I really feel that following one's true will - "do what thou wilt" in Crowley's concise words - invites synchronicity and "luck" into your life - I'm guessing this is what @Emil meant when he referred to "synchronicity as some sort of temporal materialization of our individual 'fate'"...?

    Thankfully I've always had a strong sense of my own will or pre-destination - as a child I knew that I would be an artist, as a teenager I knew I would marry my husband - but I also know that the decisions I made regarding them both could have easily gone the other way: if I'd followed conventional wisdom or listened to my parents/teachers/friends, I would never had pursued art or married my husband, and would probably be miserable... but I followed my intuition, and the older I get the more I feel glad that I did. My brother took the opposite path, and there's nothing enviable about his life now at all.

    So I guess that's my completely amateur theory - the true will is the predestination, and attempting to stray from that predestined path results in tension/unhappiness/bad luck. Life will throw you lemons either way, but it's what you do with them that dictates your experience of everything that follows.

  • One last thought. Machiavelli was named after the Devil and the Devil was named of Niccolo Machiavelli. HE was the one that destroyed the traditional view that human beings are good. He thought human beings were Evil. Hobbes took that and made it influential in England with Leviathan, which has, at its root, the State of Nature where life is "nasty, brutish and short." And so this view is continued through Locke, the Founding Fathers and even up to today.



    Machiavelli has a bad rap. I didn't consider The Prince to be at all extreme. Where does this "he thought humans were evil" come from?
  • HoggyHoggy
    Hrair
    amy: That's not what I meant - my point was that the perspectives of predestination and free will are mutually exclusive and there is always a tension or gap between them. While taking the more natural path indeed has many advantages - exploiting unconscious talents, avoiding the interference of the self-sabotaging superego etc., sometimes it is necessary to work hard in order to become different for example in overcoming addiction, or as Duncan so wonderfully puts it "choosing freedom over comfort"

    itsLeeOwen: That doesn't solve anything because a free choice by definition cannot just randomly occur
  • My problem with free will and predestination occurs precisely where my conciousness touches my experience. In my mind, I can explain every thing I do in terms of prior causes. I bought an apple because I was hungry. The hunger has a physiological cause. My physiology was caused by my mother giving birth, and on and on endlessly. I can even explain the choice. I chose an apple and not an orange because I hadn't had an apple in a while and this apple looked particularly ripe and better then the rest. Now, if I was caused to make my choice, how is it possible that I chose freely? It could not have happened any other way. But at the same time, when I choose the apple, I feel like I have made a choice. And I have to believe this to live a normal life. In the link of my last post, Peter Van Inwagen does a much more thorough job of explaining this. But rationality cannot explain free will even though it is something that seems basic to living.
  • HoggyHoggy
    Hrair
    "I can explain every thing I do in terms of prior causes."

    If a neo-nazi is fully "aware" of the prior causes of their prejudices (for example they might describe them as being caused by a lack of parental authority resulting in a narcissistic personality disorder, tempered by a lack of career opportunities and so on) but still identifies with anti-Semitism, are they or are they not acting freely?
    Post edited by Hoggy at 2012-05-07 15:19:25
  • HoggyHoggy
    Hrair
    Phew, I think I need to step away from the computer and have a nice juicy apple ;)
  • I don't think things can be both freely willed and predetermined. But I also don't know which is true. It's kind of like living a lie. I talk about everything I do as if I was caused to do it. But when I make a decision I feel like I'm practicing free will.
  • amy
    Hrair
    amy: That's not what I meant - my point was that the perspectives of predestination and free will are mutually exclusive and there is always a tension or gap between them. While taking the more natural path indeed has many advantages - exploiting unconscious talents, avoiding the interference of the self-sabotaging superego etc., sometimes it is necessary to work hard in order to become different for example in overcoming addiction, or as Duncan so wonderfully puts it "choosing freedom over comfort"


    I'm not sure that contradicts what I was saying though - indeed, following your true will is likely to be hard work most of the time, and isn't about acquiescing to whatever powers or influences surround you at any given time. The psychological/spiritual path of least resistance that I would consider to be following your intuition is oftentimes the path of most resistance in the physical world; as I said before, many of my life's most important decisions were ones considered unwise by those around me, and they have often caused me considerable hardship, but I'll take that any day over the torment of denying my true self.
  • HoggyHoggy
    Hrair
    If your intuition tells you to take a more difficult path, you're not as lazy as me! :)
  • @ Duncan: Class act apology!!

    On Gurus: The age of the guru is dead. With all we know (or guess) about quantum consciousness and the differing reality tunnels we all have, how can anyone be a leader?

    If you meet the buddha on the road, you shoot that motherfucker.

    We are all enlightened already, but most of us don't know it. All a 'guru' can do is give you an example of what may appear to be a better way of living or thinking. The change can only come from YOU.

  • I liked what Duncan said about a "third" as an alternative to the status quo or more tragically, its reflection, borne out of rebellion. The word "third" appeals to me highly because it is a label that applies to the charactecter Ender, first, in Orson Scott Card's Ender's Game, then, and more suitably, in the sequel, Speaker for the Dead, which I'm reading now. Great books. I might make "Third" my new rap name.
  • "dormant inevitabilities" is a really cool phrase.

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