Building a Floatation Tank
  • I'm building my own floatation tank from a timber frame and several loose screws in the membrane. Credits go to the soothing lesbian voice of the DTFH and my patient father. We can all build floatation tanks together and perform mass underwater enlightenments' by the end of the year. If anyone has any questions about the plans feel free to message me

    image

    Edit : A new photo of the frame almost complete is up. The next step is to screw the plywood on to make the inner surface of the tank so that it can be waterproofed and filled with water. Then its just insulation and the external layer along with the plumbing and this dirty freak will be up and running
    Post edited by rexisbest at 2012-05-30 04:16:35
  • I'm convinced I could build myself a float tank and a pontoon boat...
    Until the 20th century, reality was everything humans could touch, smell, see and hear. Since the initial publication of the charted electromagnetic spectrum, humans learned that what they can touch, smell, see, and hear... is less than one millionth of reality.
  • Its definately within the realm of possibility, It hasnt been too much effort so far considering I should be floating in less than a couple weeks
  • your tank looks a lot like the word image.
    and my soul has been psychedelicized
  • @thankyou for the constructive critiscism
  • any pictures?
  • ChallengerChallenger
    Hrair, Vampire Killer
    (that link links here - you have birthed an Ourobouros)

    if i may...
    your link
    and your pictures.
    image
    image
    image
    image
    (edit: weird, that last image has a funky preview on the link but not on the full-size)

    I am very interested in building my own, but I was really concerned about the tensile strength of the materials. i know next to nothing about engineering, but my basic assumption was that something holding that much water and salt, as well as a person, would need some pretty solid reinforcement. (that and the prospect of flooding the basement with salt water makes my balls squirm. goodbye, furnace, hot water heater, washer and dryer.)

    can't wait to see more plans. i kinda hoped Rogan would figure out a way to disseminate them on the cheap somehow, but wtf, he's telling jokes all the time. go figure.




    erm... ok, just popped over to floatlab after adding that last drawing. when i saw that little stick figure it made me smile, then i realized your design is probably a bit thin. you'll have to float with your arms jammed down by your sides or let them bump the sides of the tank.

    4′ Wide x 8′ Long x 4′ Tall = $19,500*

    Four feet wide... whaddaya think?
    Post edited by Challenger at 2012-05-17 19:34:27
    .'. ParAdoX .'.
  • when you link an image, put the image source in the "" after ahref= and then put the text link in between the > <
    like this
    image

    or copy the Direct Link from Imgur and paste it into the Image button
    and my soul has been psychedelicized
  • For some reason I picture a lot of dead DTFH members, who forgot to include air tanks.
    photo lao-tzu-field1copysmall.jpg
  • ChallengerChallenger
    Hrair, Vampire Killer

    For some reason I picture a lot of dead DTFH members, who forgot to include air tanks.



    image

    come float with us
    .'. ParAdoX .'.
  • do you think I could build one by buying 2 of these, putting one upside down on top of the other, covering it with some sort of black material to keep out all light, and then filling the water with a shit load of water softener salt?

    image

    Also, this is a serious question, not even a joke.
    Post edited by YouHaveSchizophrenia at 2012-05-17 19:56:56
  • ChallengerChallenger
    Hrair, Vampire Killer
    that seems like a pretty elegant solution, actually.

    you'd still need air circulation, and some way to deal with the noise (though i personally wouldn't mind the white noise of a fan, as i have obnoxious neighbors across the street).

    epsom salts look like the standard. 800-1000 lbs of it, from what i'm reading.

    another consideration is the temperature, but i think that could be solved with an old waterbed heater.

    COME ON, DIY FLOAT TANK.
    .'. ParAdoX .'.
  • serious? an inflatable will not hold up under the weight of salt + water. haha.
    and my soul has been psychedelicized
  • ChallengerChallenger
    Hrair, Vampire Killer

    serious? an inflatable will not hold up under the weight of salt + water. haha.



    so if i put four 200 lb. adults into that pool it will burst?
    .'. ParAdoX .'.
  • Can I get a link to the specs for that thing? I like the simplicity of the idea. A float tank is pretty simple. Water, salt, heater, noise and light shield. The heater would have to be pretty massive to heat that volume of heavily salinated water. The hard part is finding a place to put the thing. A nice concrete basement floor with a drain would be ideal. Leaks and spills are your worst nightmare.
    and my soul has been psychedelicized
  • For some reason I picture a lot of dead DTFH members, who forgot to include air tanks.



    image

    come float with us


    Fuuuuuuuuuu. I cannot stop laughing. Thanks!!! :)
    photo lao-tzu-field1copysmall.jpg
  • ChallengerChallenger
    Hrair, Vampire Killer

    Can I get a link to the specs for that thing?



    the picture is an Intex Swim Center Family Pool .. they seem large enough but i would be curious to see if it would hold up with all that salt in it.

    as i was thinking about the individual weight distribution of bodies compared to the equal distribution of the weight of the salt dissolved in the water, it occurred to me that there would be more outward pressure with the salt than with people, whose weight either displaces the water upwards or pushes downward against the floor. you might be right that the inflatables won't hold up.

    my idea was to build a frame like @rexisbest and then basically drape the thickest plastic i could get to create the inside of the "tank", but this has its own problems.

    Fuuuuuuuuuu. I cannot stop laughing. Thanks!!! :)



    :D
    .'. ParAdoX .'.
  • What about the same idea but with some stronger material like a white water raft?

    Basically, I'm just thinking that if I could find a solid base that would hold the water and salt, I could start from there.

    I also don't have much space in my house or basement, so am considering something that could be durable in the back yard. Of course, where I live this could only be a summer project.
    Post edited by YouHaveSchizophrenia at 2012-05-17 22:28:50
  • zachszachs
    Hrair
    Awesome idea. I'll let you guys figure out the details and maybe I can come along this summer and hijack some schematics to build my own.

    @challenger haha I like the picture you posted, kind of a morbid tank but effective I'm sure :)
  • What about the same idea but with some stronger material like a white water raft?

    Basically, I'm just thinking that if I could find a solid base that would hold the water and salt, I could start from there.



    use pond liner inside a solid built frame. add a pump, reservoir, heater, sound and light insulation.
    and my soul has been psychedelicized
  • Build it from 2x4 screwed together. Space them every sixteen inches. Line the inside with OSB . That would be a strong base. Maybe a old tent setup to create a top. Cover the tent with a black tarp. The base could be lined with a pond liner. Maybe use a couple of waterbed heaters to warm the water. They would go under the liner. Maybe they would be ineffective, but it would be worth trying. The salt would be the greatest expense. It would also weigh a ton. Sorry upstairs apartment dwellers.
  • 48"x96"x12"=239gallons water plus salt. That's some serious weight
  • I wonder if you can match the buoyancy effect of the salt additive by replacing it with some type of fine mesh.... allowing for a high exchange rate of fresh water and an easily monetizeable service with cleanliness guarantees and limited chemical additives. Each new customer would be like filling a bath. You can even add a self clean system within the tanks. Touch up, doors, piping, equipment, and architectural finish pending....

    Photobucket
    Post edited by Gubermensch at 2012-05-18 03:13:36
  • @Challenger The width of my tank should be longer than the tanks i have been using at the commercial place i was going to so whilst you cant completely stretch out in mine its still fairly wide, The heating will be done by pumping the water out of the tank through an aquarium heater and into a UV bacteria killing thing then back into the insulated tank

    @pedalphile I'm putting mine underneath the house in a hole I'm dreading to dig that will hopefully be deep enough so that my ears sit underneath the ground. Our house is raised off stilts just enough to fit the tank, woo living in australia and In a "flood zone"

    @cabbag The frame will be covered in plywood with an insulation layer the thickness of the frame between the internal and external components of the tank. A paint on waterproof membrane similar to the those used in bathrooms will line the inside of the tank to make it waterproof. This was the simplest method i could conceive, hopefully less than two weeks and i will be floating with only the sound of edibles digesting in my stomach.

    http://www.isolationtankplans.com/welcome/ These plans are so detailed and my plumbing system is based exactly off these. ENJOY

  • use pond liner inside a solid built frame. add a pump, reservoir, heater, sound and light insulation.



    Pond liner, that's perfect. Thanks!
  • ChallengerChallenger
    Hrair, Vampire Killer
    cabbag said:

    48"x96"x12"=239gallons water plus salt. That's some serious weight



    ~240 gal. x 8 (lbs./gal.) = 1920 lbs for the water alone

    rexisbest said:

    @Challenger The width of my tank should be longer than the tanks i have been using at the commercial place i was going to so whilst you cant completely stretch out in mine its still fairly wide, The heating will be done by pumping the water out of the tank through an aquarium heater and into a UV bacteria killing thing then back into the insulated tank

    @pedalphile I'm putting mine underneath the house in a hole I'm dreading to dig that will hopefully be deep enough so that my ears sit underneath the ground. Our house is raised off stilts just enough to fit the tank, woo living in australia and In a "flood zone"

    @cabbag The frame will be covered in plywood with an insulation layer the thickness of the frame between the internal and external components of the tank. A paint on waterproof membrane similar to the those used in bathrooms will line the inside of the tank to make it waterproof. This was the simplest method i could conceive, hopefully less than two weeks and i will be floating with only the sound of edibles digesting in my stomach.

    http://www.isolationtankplans.com/welcome/ These plans are so detailed and my plumbing system is based exactly off these. ENJOY



    this is going to be a very cool project to follow

    also, FLOOD ZONE? STILTS? yowza.. and i was worried about my foundation shifting.
    .'. ParAdoX .'.
  • @Gubermensch
    If you are suspended on a mesh support is it really isolation? Your skin will be rubbing and touching the mesh. It might be a minor sensation that you could possibly ignore, but who knows. Isolation = floating in space. I think floating in water is an essential element.
    and my soul has been psychedelicized
  • There will still be fresh water heated to body temperature. The mesh is to replace the minor buoyancy force the salt provides. If you got creative enough with the mesh material, I think it'd be hard to notice.

    The benefit is maintenance, the ease of cleaning, less chemical dependency, high potential exchange rate of water, salt cost savings, and on'anon.

    Might not work, just kicking the idea around...
  • @challenger haha its only a flood zone in the technical Insurance policy sense, its never flooded and wont for a very long time. It should be looking like a tank in a few days so I'll post more pictures very soon
  • The quantity of salt would kill most bacteria. The mesh I think would be a distraction. I would rather recycle the salt water through a uv light filter to eliminate any possible germs. For the average person you could build your own tank for about 1500 and have it functional.
  • @cabbag

    I'm thinking moreso for a small commercial operation...

    Hence the incentive to eliminate salt to flush immediately after usage, self-clean, and re-fill with fresh water from a large UV to RO/DI filtration system.

    Salt isnt close to a decent anti-microbial. UV would do it, but it doesn't remove particulate matter.

    I wonder what other materials/substances could be used to increase buoyancy/lift..... hear me out! Mini rubber air balls! :p
  • What about a silk sheet?
  • any news?
  • @BigNasty Just updated with a photo of the frame almost complete
  • @cabbag Although it's very strong and durable, proper cleaning is needed to make it long lasting. Silk is very absorbent in nature. It will absorb almost anything in the air including dirt and your sweat. This may result in degradation.

    Article Source: http://EzineArticles.com/5428280

    So probably not from a durability perspective. A flexible, fine cloth mesh is ideal. Help me find a product and manufacturer. :p
    Post edited by Gubermensch at 2012-05-31 01:05:39
  • A flexible, fine mesh....
    Help guise.
    Post edited by Gubermensch at 2012-06-03 15:32:26
  • JoshJosh
    Hrair
    Making one of these to be functional and durable is gonna require some good equipment which is where the cost will kill you. i've built swimming pools, tile spas and tile tubs in the past and while the building process won't be the same as this it seems like the equipment is similar by looking at the floatlabs stuff. if i ever build one it will be out of concrete.
    What would Don Genaro do?
  • EdenEden
    Hrair
    @Gubermensch
    nothing can be touching you, the water is a small exception we have to deal with. ;p

    this is why you don't go in with a bathing suit. you aren't even supposed to go in if you have a scratch on your body as it could be terribly distracting.
  • @Eden
    A scratch in salt water, no doubt. :)
    OK, well I've never floated, so I'll take your word for it.
    Epsom salt seems expensive and maintenance intensive, but perhaps there's no substitute.
  • JoshJosh
    Hrair
    if you want a flexible fine mesh to suspend you while you lay down get a hammock.
    What would Don Genaro do?
  • @ItsLeeOwen well the intention was to accelerate us at a greater rate towards the impending singularity, with us all lying in salty water as it occurs.
    Post edited by rexisbest at 2012-06-05 21:28:12
  • What a great thread! I'm glad to see life in the float tank community. So many dead threads from 5 years ago out there. I've built 3 tanks over the years, similar to the 3 little pigs. Each got a little better :)

    Right now I'm working on a concept of building a DIY sub $500 fully functioning tank, that will get you floating and also allow you to upgrade the unit over time so you can end up with the exact experience you want once you find out what kind of floater you are.
  • @Timeismadeup thanks man, do you have any photos of your tanks. What sort of experiences have you had from floating, any similar to rogans or john lilleys?
  • I'm the owner of the site http://isolationtankplans.com I was in your shoes last year. This is the best way to get started floating on a budget. There's just not a lot of work-arounds for the real floating experience. If you have questions my email is shane@isolationtankplans.com

    Start floating! It's worth it.
  • @isolationtankplans Hah what a small world/internet, my plans are based almost solely from yours as I plan on using your filtration/heating system. My biggest problem is finding the heating/filtration equipment with australian power adapters. How much has your heating system cost you and do you leave it running 24/7. Thanks again for allowing me to start building my tank
  • Anyone still watching this thread? Im curious how this project is going or if anyone else is building their own tank. We would like to eventually build a tank for my husband, myself and my 9 year old son, whenever we come across the most feasible cost effective plans so I'm curious how this method has worked out for you. You know the float lab guy I talked to recently said he only changes the salt water 1-2 times a year, but uses the uv filter after each customer, he says it's only a couple hundred $ a year n hasn't had a problem with cleanliness or bacteria. I can't imagine a flotation tank that you don't actually float in, I think the salt is an absolute must for getting that weightless flying feeling.
  • @RedheadsRevenge my tank is still being worked on , I have just finished fixing the internal plywood sheets to the frame of the tank , so atm it looks like a box and you can lie down in it. It definately is a massive project to undertake but having my own personal float tank is priceless to me so I'm in no rush to finish it. That being said it should be done my christmas and if someone was to work on this consistently I could see it being finished in a month
  • If ypu've got a spare $25 this guy will give you full access to his plans for an isolation tank. Seems Legit.

    http://www.isolationtankplans.com/welcome/
    We are the inheritors of millions and millions of years of successfully lived lives and successful adaptations to changing conditions in the natural world. Now the challenge passes to us, the living, so that the yet-to-be-born may have a place to put their feet, and a sky to walk under. - Terence Mckenna.
  • Hows it going with the build?
  • I would like to see where this goes, especially with how you plan to filter the water in the tank.
    T͙̩̱͝ḫ͍̯̼͚͡e̘̘̱͈͓ ͞Dą͙͈̮͙̥̙r̼̗̤͈͎ḱ̬̙̜͉̭̭͕ ̱̪̝̣͈͘ͅU͔͚̟̟̜͠n̟̜̜d͍͡e̺̦̳̬r̕b͉̲ẹ̸̠̬ͅļ̫l͉͓̱̭͓̼ỵ̥̠̖̗͍̙ ̕n̖e̦͚̜̩v̲͙͠e̮̯̻̜̦r̤̹̮͡ ̟͍͈͇̲͠f̴̤̣̜̣o̗͓̱̖͙̟̳r͚͈̩͍̼̘g̗͇̱̗̺̜͚e̠̘͡t̖̘s͖̬̰̹̪̻̹

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